Look after those who look after us

The SLOMO or slow down, move over law is now in force in Western Australia.

02 Mar 2018
The law requires all drivers to safely slow to a maximum of 40km/h when passing a stationary emergency or incident response vehicle with lights flashing that is attending a roadside incident.

Police and Road Safety Minister Michelle Roberts and Acting Road Safety Commissioner Iain Cameron observed a demonstration by Drive Safe Australia that highlighted how speed affects the ability of a driver to stop in an emergency situation, including reaction time by the driver and the braking distance required.

Mr Cameron said the demonstration showed that a little bit of speed makes a big difference to the safety of vulnerable road users.

“At 60 to 65km/h, if a pedestrian or cyclist is struck, there is an 85 per cent chance they’ll be seriously injured or worse,” said Mr Cameron.

“At 40 kilometres an hour, that reverses, and a pedestrian or cyclist won’t be seriously injured.”
At 60 to 65km/h, if a pedestrian or cyclist is struck, there is an 85 per cent chance they’ll be seriously injured or worse.
The average family car travelling at 60 km/h on a dry road in good conditions needs 45 metres to stop, while that same vehicle travelling in the same conditions at 40km/h only requires 26 metres to stop.

“The reason 40km/h was chosen here is to protect those people who work at the roadside and are very vulnerable,” said Mr Cameron.

“Please, slow down, move over and let these people do their job to keep us safe, and then go home to their loved ones at night.”

The penalty for contravening the SLOMO law is $300 and 3 demerit points.
Please, slow down, move over and let these people do their job to keep us safe.
For more information on SLOMO, please visit our Emergency and breakdown vehicles page.

2 Comments

  • Martyn Hewitt 7/03/2018 8:56:57 PM
    To slow four laines of freeway trafic because the emergency laine is in use by a tow truck or the Rac is changing a tyre is just madness it will cause more harm than good.

  • Sharka 12/03/2018 1:05:08 PM
    Hi Martyn,
    Thank you for your comment.
    The new law protects the lives of those responding to an emergency situation on the roads, and under the new law, that includes those in vehicles used by tow trucks and roadside assistance vehicles. These workers do not have the time to set up safety barriers, slower speed signs etc as they are responding to an unexpected roadside emergency or incident and need to be protected while doing their job.
    Therefore, the legislation provides uniformity of speed for all lanes travelling in the same direction as a roadside emergency. It is now the law to slow to a maximum of 40km/h and drivers who do not adhere will be penalised.
    Kind Regards,

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