Saving Lives Together

Papers about Speed

The Safe Speed cornerstone includes ensuring speed limits and travel speeds reflect the safety of the road infrastructure by:
 
  • Undertaking speed enforcement and education.
  • Establishing speed limits according to the features of the road and roadside, vehicle crash-worthiness and the functional performance and known limits of the road user.
An evaluation of the effectiveness of high speed seagull intersections in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia (2016)
Seagull islands are a common 'at-grade' treatment for three legged T-intersections used on high traffic volume roads and dual carriageways in countries such as Australia, New Zealand and the United States.

The aim of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of high speed seagull intersections on WA roads located in the metropolitan area.
 
The research found that the treatment was effective on Marmion Avenue, reducing all reported crashes by 21.4% and casualty crashes by 62.4%.
 
The treatment could potentially also be effective on roads of similar conditions and characteristics, but there no definitive conclusion for roads with different conditions, pending the availability of more usable data for future research.
 
Road safety benefit
This research was beneficial to the extent that it provides Government with a review of a potential counter-measure.
As there were difficulties with the assessment, the recommendations include:

 
  • Better data keeping as to the location of this intersection type.
  • Further research with larger data sets.
An evaluation of the effectiveness of high speed seagull intersections in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia (2016)
Rural Intersection Active Warning System: A Driving Simulator Study (2018)
Rural Intersection Active Warning Systems warn drivers on regional highways when other drivers are approaching on minor roads.

The aim of this research was to evaluate driver performance while navigating through a Rural Intersection Active Warning System (RIAWS) compared to a traditional signed intersection, without signs, using a laboratory-based driving simulator. The simulator was completed by 100 drivers aged between 18-80 years with a current WA C class licence.
The aim of this research was to evaluate driver performance while navigating through a Rural Intersection Active Warning System (RIAWS) compared to a traditional signed intersection, without signs, using a laboratory-based driving simulator. The simulator was completed by 100 drivers aged between 18-80 years with a current WA C class licence.

Road Safety Benefit
The research found that RIAWS “80km/h” sign provided the most effective option for reducing driver speeds on approach to rural intersections and recommended that these signs (and not the RIAWS “slow down” signs) are considered for implementation at suitable rural sites in WA.
The research also recommended that further research is undertaken to determine the most effective placement of the RIAWS “80km/h” signs and how they perform on curved WA roads.


Rural Intersection Active Warning System: A Driving Simulator Study (2018)