Research and Evaluation Program

The Road Safety Research and Evaluation Program includes research that is:

  • Proactive and planned, through engagement with our locally based road safety research centre: Curtin-Monash Accident Research Centre (C-MARC).
  • Responsive to emerging issue and need, through engagement with additional research institutions and experts.
  • Ongoing, through memberships with other research agencies.

The Road Safety Research and Evaluation Program is informed by the Road Safety Research Review Committee (RSRRC), Chaired by the Commission’s Assistant Director Strategy and Policy. The RSRRC is a sub-committee to the Road Safety Council with representation from across government and community. The RSRRC role is to provide strategic road safety advice from across the respective agencies in relation to future research. This enables the Commission to ensure that future research:

  • Aligns to whole of government priorities and thereby, is responsive to the current road safety issues and emerging trends relevant to WA.
  • Increases the road safety research base within WA.
  • Avoids duplication of research within WA.
  • Represents return on investment for WA.

2.1 Proactive research:

In 2009, the Curtin- Monash Accident Research Centre (C-MARC) was established in WA. C-MARC is a multidisciplinary road safety research centre located at Curtin University. C-MARC’s directive is to:

  • Contribute scientific evidence to the community on road safety.
  • Translate scientific evidence into policy and practice.
  • Ensure best practice is identified for successful action through the latest findings and practices from WA, from Australia and from around the world.
  • Develop research training courses in road safety and injury.
  • Respond to the needs of their key road safety injury stakeholders in the State.
  • Develop strong capacity to respond effectively to road safety challenges.

Through guidance by the Commission, C-MARC delivers an annual research program of work for the state. The annual program is informed via advice from the RSRRC and guided by the Road Safety Council priorities.

2.2 Responsive research

The Commission also engages other research on a responsive basis. This often involves engagement with other research experts.

2.3 Ongoing research

The Commission also recognises the opportunity that stems from participating in research that operates at the national level. For example, participating in research:
  • Provided through grants administered via the Australian Research Council.
  • Undertaken to promote the uptake of safer vehicles, such as:
    • the Vehicle Safety Research Group
    • Australasian New Car Assessment Program (ANCAP)
    • Motorcycle Clothing Assessment Program

Other Research

Road safety research is extensive and there are a number of well established road safety research centres within and outside of Australia undertaking research in this area. The Commission acknowledges and supports all stakeholders in their interest in road safety research. Listed below are links to contemporary research that may be of interest to our community.

The relationship between vehicle visibility and pedestrian injury risk and the safety benefits of reversing technologies for the Australasian fleet
Caveat
To the extent possible, the Commission is committed to providing the community with full access to road safety research funded via the Road Trauma Trust Account (RTTA). However, on occasions, reports may be provided in a summarised version or a decision to not release may be made based on the individual circumstances at the time and in recognition of our duties pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act 1992. Should you wish to discuss access to our research reports further, please email info@rsc.wa.gov.au