Emergency and breakdown vehicles

Slow Down, Move Over

Law change effective 2 March 2018
Slow Down, Move Over banner featuring emergency workers.

Attending roadside incidents can be risky business, that’s why, from 2 March 2018, our roads will be safer for workers attending roadside incidents. Flashing lights on a stationary vehicle means approaching vehicles must slow down, move over (if possible) and pass at 40 kilometres per hour. Let’s look after those who look after us.

Campaign videos

FAQs - Slow Down, Move Over (SLOMO)

The State Government has introduced the SLOMO law to improve the road safety of people attending roadside emergencies in Western Australia.

The new law requires motorists to reduce speed to a maximum of 40km/h when passing incident response vehicles with flashing lights and, where possible and safe to do so, move to the next lane.

Offence Penalty Demerits
Failure to slow down and move over $300 3

What does SLOMO mean?

SLOMO stands for Slow Down, Move Over. The SLOMO law requires drivers to slow down around stationary emergency vehicles, tow trucks, Incident Response Service vehicles and motor break-down service vehicles which are displaying flashing lights while attending an incident.

This includes vehicles used by WA Police Force, St John Ambulance, Department of Fire and Emergency Services, break-down service vehicles (such as the RAC), Main Roads WA Incident Response Service and towing companies on site to salvage or tow vehicles.

Why do we need the SLOMO law?

The intent of the new law is to provide a safer environment for workers who respond to incidents on the road.

When do I need to slow down?

Drivers in all lanes travelling in the same direction as the lane or emergency lane where the emergency or incident response vehicles with flashing lights are stopped will be required to slow down and travel at no more than 40km/h when passing.

Do I need to slow down if I am driving on the other side of the road?

Vehicles travelling in oncoming traffic from the other direction will not be required to slow down. 

However, if there is an incident that has occurred in the middle of the road or on a median strip for instance, traffic in both directions would be required to slow down if lanes in both directions are affected by an incident.

When should I move my vehicle into the next lane?

Where there are multiple lanes travelling in the same direction, and it is safe to do so, drivers should also move to another lane to give the incident response workers more room.

What is the penalty for breaking the SLOMO laws?

The penalty for this offence is three demerit points and $300.

Slow Down, Move Over video

Failure to give way

Police, fire and ambulance vehicles are emergency vehicles.

On Western Australian roads you must clear the way to allow every emergency vehicle using blue or red flashing lights and/or sounding an alarm to easily pass. When an emergency vehicle is approaching:

  • Stay calm and check to see where it is.
  • Give way to it by moving as far to the left of the road as possible.
  • If you can’t move left, slow down, indicate left and let the emergency vehicle drive around you.
  • Use your indicator to signal your intentions to the driver of the emergency vehicle.
  • If you are in the left lane, allow other vehicles from an adjacent lane to move into your lane if they need to.

When giving way to an emergency vehicle DO NOT break the law (e.g. Drive through a red light or speed).

Offence Penalty Demerits
Failure to give way to an emergency vehicle $400 4
 

The information available on our website provides a simple interpretation of the law and is not intended to constitute legal advice. Full details of traffic offences and penalties are contained in the Road Traffic Code 2000.
 

Failure to give way video